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Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address the big issues facing america. and it wawnltd that there weren't -- wasn't that there weren't profound differences. there were fierce differences, emotional differences, deep differences but folks came to this floor, they conversed, they laid out their arguments and ultimately they made decisions about which way to go. and they didn't bring the attitude let's just paralyze this chamber from doing doing nothing. had they d
approval rating in a while. this is the natural ebb and flow. it usually builds up after winning re-election. there are a lot of things in the agenda space. you pay off a limited budget right? you can purchase things with that political capital. the horror of newtown is such that it has forced this issue to the foreti particularly in the wake of aurora. if you were designing the agenda in the absence of that and obviously you can't do that is this something that you want to see prioritized or are there other things you would put ahead of it? >> no. this is something that needs to be prioritized. of course the whole issue of sequestration and raising the debt ceiling limit, getting the budget under control, are probably our highest priority at this point in time. we should be meeting four and five days a week in committee doing the job that we were elected to do and the republican leadership has not set a schedule that we can do that. the whole gun control issue has been on the front pages now for decades and the democrats, republicans, none of us have really done anything about it. so i thin
and the nation's debt. joining me now to debate those issues, chuck schumer of new york and newly elected republican senator ted cruz of texas. welcome back as senator cruz to "meet the press." back to both of you. i want to start on the gun debate. because as i say, even before the second term is officially underway thissy is bait is well underway. here are the highlights of what the president wants to accomplish. universal background checks. he'd like to pursue a ban on high capacity magazines. an assault weapons ban that lapsed in 2004. and he'd like stricter laws on gun trafficking. but senator schumer, just as i challenged wayne lapierre of the nra very hard when this came up, i challenge you as well with a question of, is this really going to make a difference? and rich lawry wrote something that caught my attention in "the national review." no one can write a law against mothers owning guns that one day might be turned against them by deranged sons who then commit horrific acts of murder-suicide. shooting rampages are hard to prevent because they are so often committed by young men
election, for example, i think the most racially divisive comment of the entire election was joe biden's comment where he said if the republicans win, they are, quote, going to put y'all back in chains. that made my heart weep to see a sitting vice president playing to racial fears and playing on those issues. i think that's unfortunate. i don't think it has any place in politics. >> chuck hagel, you were very tepid on "meet the press" a couple of weeks ago. >> i was. >> now you've met with him, you're more comfortable, you'll support him? >> i am. >> what changed? >> i said on your show that i had real concerns. i spent 90 minutes with him. i asked him very specific questions on the things that troubled me. his answers were forth right. and they were answers that alayed my concerns. should we keep every option on the table to prevent a nuclear iran? yes. i went further. i said, do you think we can tolerate a nuclear iran? he said no. and i said to him, well, then, if we had to use military as the only choice, would you? he said yes. second, i asked him hezbollah and hamas, should they
: actually, think about the demographic politics of the last election. what do all of the broad array of critics not just those ones but what do they have in common? aside from the obvious -- they're all white. they're all male. now, of course, not every white male thinks the same way that they do. but it is notable that this virulent anti-regulation bunch the folks who have been the first shakers not just rush limbaugh, but the folks in congress too they're made up of mostly that same demographic group. in fact, those demographics mirror the nra itself. the nra's board is 87% male and 93% white. the nra's wayne lapierrre keeps insisting his group is bipartisan but take a look at this. the overwhelming majority of congress members with an "a" rating from the nra are republicans. on the other end of the spectrum, the fs are almost entirely democrats. a little sliver of red there you can barely even see it. and of course, the funding follows accordingly. 97% of nra funds went to republican in the last election. but it seems like the nra is not only not representative of the full america
democrats in line. many of them are up for re-election in 2014. potentially vulnerable. montana senator max baucus responded to the senate in a statement, quote, before passing new laws, we need a debate that respects responsible, law-abiding gun owners in montana instead of a one-size-fits-all directives from washington. joe manchin said, quote, i'm disappointed the president did not recommend the creation of a national commission on mass violence that i have proposed. a national commission can build the consensus we need for real action, backed not only by gun control advocates, mental health experts and entertainment industry executives but also by law-abiding gun owners. >>> the white house is worried that if this fight becomes too much about the assault weapons ban, and not enough about measures, which are more politically possible, they'll have a problem. they want to keep people focused on fights they can win. background checks, things like that. republicans have unsurprisingly responded negatively, including florida senator marco rubio. >> by the own admission of the white house, wh
is supposed to be for the people. it is not. we really don't elect the president no more. the electoral votes do. we don't have any say. we are the ones that just keep paying. we are paying more and more and more taxes all the time. so there's always some reason they've got to have more money. why don't they take some money out of their pockets for one year? let them learn to live like we do. they all live way above their means. does not take a half million dollars or zero million dollars a year to live.- -- it does not take a half million dollars or $1 million a year to live. host: we have members of congress coming in this morning and we will throw out your proposal to them to see what they think. on twitter -- here's a headline in the washington post. let's hear or twice house secretary jay carney hata said. [video clip] >> the bill still has to overcome concerns expressed by members of the house and senate before it can pass both chambers and reached the president's desk. if it does and it reaches his desk, he will not stand in the way of the bill becoming law. broadly speaking, i will po
in that regard in through the fire in the election. i think that's fair. the senate just simply has not. and it is discouraging. you know, it just takes 51 votes. that's all it takes over there. i actually heard commentators tell us, oh, no, it takes 60. it takes no such thing. it just takes 51 votes where the majority now has 55 and at one point had 59 and was unable to -- unwilling, i should say, get 51 where you got over 228 of our members do last year which was actually vote on a budget going into an election year. mr. chairman, i'm delighted to see legs like this. i do think there are legitimate constitutional questions. i think those we'll have a vigorous discussion about that in the next couple of days. i'm comforted by some of the precedence you cite, mr. at the end of the day, this is about getting us to do our jobs. there isn't a member up here that wouldn't tell you it really is our obligation to write a budget. again, our friends in the majority did not. i'm really happy to see the minority, they have chosen to do so. i think it's actually a very good thing. the minority, ge
it because he doesn't have to worry about getting re-elected. >> well, he wasn't concealing anything. he's a progressive democrat. i loved the speech yesterday because of what he didn't say. he very often goes into this kind of airy dreaming of how we'll just transcend partisanship. well, we won't. politics is partisan. washington is partisan. it was for president clinton who wanted to campaign that he was there, campaigned saying i want to be a uniter, not a divider. our president said, he offered a vision that republicans should sign on to. they used to be tough when i was a kid. now they are just whiny. he reached out to them plenty in his first term and all they did was spit in his eye. >> i think when it comes to comprehensive immigration reform, i think the president can work with senator marco rubio. but what about on climate change? what about same-sex marriage? is there going to be cooperation in those two areas? >> number one, on same-sex marriage, the president hasn't thrown any weight behind legislation or for repealing the legislation that paul's because, bill's boss signed
and a number of senators as well. and to ask him directly about the elections and ask him about my second question. but i wanted to get your sense of where you see those lexes going. what efforts you can undertake to make sure that they are free and fair because they've been, i think, central to the next chapter in this transition. i just wanted to comment on that. the second question as it relates to afghanistan is one that senator boxer raised and her work on this has been exemplary, on women and girls and in particular, i have a -- an amendment that we got through the national defense authorization act which would require both state and defense to file a report on the efforts to promote the security of afghan women and girls just by way of itemization monitoring and responding to changes in women's security that will be part of the report. secondly, improving gender sensitivity and responsiveness among the afghan security forces and increasing the recruitment and retention of women in the afghan security forces. so both with regard to the election and women and girls. >> senator with r
and the conservatives and that his goal is to win the 2014 elections and return control of the house to the democrats. most second term presidents have a significantly less partisan and less confrontational attitude towards that they try to >>> a lot of people never thought he was elected in the first place, and today, tracking poll, three day running average, 49% for obama. he was at 67% in the polls four years ago. 18-point decline from that. when operating is not designed to make it more popular and bring the country together. >> bill: now, one of the people that is thought to be a competitor to the democrats in the next presidential election is governor chris christie of new jersey. recently nra took out an ad saying president obama was a hypocrite because he sends his children to school protected by armed guards and that he doesn't want armed guards in other schools. christie didn't like that ad by the nra and said this. >> don't be dragging peoples' children into this. it's wrong z i think it's a means that makes them less of a valid, trusted source of information on the real issues. that confr
fundamental responsibility of any elected official is to pass a budget. now when we took over in the house in four months, we passed the budget, many of you have said, was one of the toughest ones to come out of the house. higher vote than at any other time in the last decade. democrats said we are going to do political damage to you in the election. you know what? we were honest with the american public. where we currently stood and our budget wasn't about just today but tomorrow, but about securing medicare and building for a better future for your children. what's the history in the senate? last time they passed the budget, the ipad hadn't been introduced. we have had trillion dollar deficits every year. nobody would expect to be paid if they didn't do their job. no budget, no pay. if harry reid cannot pass a budget, they are fundamentally moving the responsibility why they should even be in the majority. to me, this is a turning point for this country, getting to the fundamentals of a planning for the future that this could be the mark of a great american comeback. >> good evening. yes
. >> my colleague and i went to chicago. this was in the midst of the election and picked up opposition research prepared by jack ryan, obama's onetime republican senate point. he found all this information. the way he frames it, and i think it's probably right, is that obama was always very soft on crime but very tough on guns. every time obama had a crime vote to take when he was in the illinois state senate, he always voted "present" because he didn't want to -- for two reasons. one, he said that criminal law disproportionately affected african-americans. he saw a racial component there. additionally, he said i don't want to clog the court system with all these cases. what do you want to clog the court system with? we thought given his rhetoric on guns lately it would be interesting to bring up this vote where he said i don't want to give tougher prosecution to children who shoot in schools. >>steve: you look at chicago, one of the murder capitals of the world. nothing the president proposed the other day would crack down on handgun violence in chicago. there is one other thing we wa
fulfilled its responsibility in that regard in the last two years and went through the fire in the election. i think that's fair. the senate just simply has not. and it is discouraging. you know, it just takes 51 votes. that's all it takes over there. i actually heard commentators tell us, oh, no, it takes 60. it takes no such thing. it just takes 51 votes where the majority now has 55 and at one point had 59 and was unable to -- unwilling, i should say, get 51 where you got over 228 of our members do last year which was actually vote on a budget going into an election year. mr. chairman, i'm delighted to see legs like this. i do think there are legitimate constitutional questions. i think those we'll have a vigorous discussion about that in the next couple of days. i'm comforted by some of the precedence you cite, mr. chairman. at the end of the day, this is about getting us to do our jobs. there isn't a member up here that wouldn't tell you it really is our obligation to write a budget. again, our friends in the majority did not. i'm really happy to see the minority, they have chosen to d
is working and in fact, it wasn't working. it helped get this president re-elected by misleading the american public, but now, the chickens are coming home to roost and we're going to continue to pursue this until we find the truth. >> i want to ask you one other question based on what your republican colleague rand paul said today. it was a pretty strong statement. here he is. >> had i been president at the time and i found that you did not read the cables from benghazi, you did not read the cables from ambassador stevens, i would have relieved you of you post. i think it's inexcusable. >> do you agree? >> i'd say the issue is moot because hillary clinton is moving on and senator kerry's stepping up to the plate probably, so that's rand paul's opinion. >> do you think she'd make a good president? i have to ask that because 67% of this country view her favorably. her unfavorable is 28%. the president, anybody in this country, would die for that. >> listen, the people on the other side of the aisle aren't taking the fact this nation's going bankrupt seriously, so she's a member of that party,
to the ceremony in hand. she's been planning this trip since two days after the election. >> to see the inauguration and see it live, and to be included in a large group of people who are here and excited is amazing. >> tourism officials say between 600,000 and 800,000 people are expected to converge in the area over the weekend. it will add up to about $50 million in revenue during a slow time of the year. >> when you think of washington, d.c. it is not a traditional period where we have a lot of business. this is a positive thing for the city and the economy. >> the wrights flu in from florida. >> we -- flew in from florida. >> we're excited to be here and engage in an american tradition. >> despite all the people coming to town, there are still open hotel rooms. occupancy ratings are about 70% right now they were 90% four years ago. you can expect to see deals out there this weekend. reporting live in northwest washington suzanne kennedy. >> now as businesses prepare for a busy three days the transit is getting ready for >> the rush is on already as hun
with the congress and then in 2012 what he felt was vindication in the election, how that changes his approach to dealing with congress and dealing with the country. it's going to be interesting to see how successful he can be. >> yeah. yep, yep. we'll see. you know, i don't -- you just don't want to push an agenda too far if it was still a pretty close election, john. we'll see. but i don't feel like -- >> well, it was. >> i don't feel like a whole lot of unity was headed our way. this is like throwing down the gauntlet and -- >> i agree with you. he was. and one of the dangers for presidents is that they get a little too confident, a little too cocky. we'll see whether he is reaching a little bit further than he can grasp. now, i willsy that what house republicans did last week on the debt limit was a promising sign for him in the sense that -- and i think he took it that way, which is that they -- at his insistence, he came out after the election and said i'm not going to play that game on the debt limit. in the end, they have broken the link between spending cuts and -- at least in the sho
employees whether we are elected officials or appointed or civil service employees have to hold ourselves to a higher standard and obviously this fellow hasn't done that. >> alisyn: arguing hey it was just laying around here. i needed power and he is just resourceful. >> well, that may be his argument. the fact is that doesn't hold muster with the public. this it fellow is being paid with public money and you just can't help yourself to public products. >> let's talk about that salary he was collecting $165,000 a year because did he this has now been cut in half to $83,000 a year. does that punishment sit well with you? is that good enough. >> i'm note sure. that's something for the mta to answer. certainly, they are going to look at this its swa. they have all of the facts. and he has to answer to his supervisors. we don't know what he has done. he apparently used other employees to do this as well. he loaded the generator with his employees into a public vehicle during work hours brought the generator to his home during work hours. you know. if you are him you have just had your salary
confidence coming back after the election? and some of the bigger guys coming in maybe looking for some construction loans, commercial loans that you can make a ton of money on in the second half of 2013? >> well, we saw pretty good loan growth in the course of 2012, pipelines because we had strong closings in the fourth quarter are down a little bit as we transition into the year. i would say that we haven't -- have not seen a big pick-up in confidence in the marketplace. you're correct and we got through the fiscal cliff, but we've got a number of different things, whether it be the debt ceiling, the sequester, the continuing resolution in d.c. that are on the surface. our sense is customers are gaining confidence, they're willing to make marginal investments, but they're going to be very measured steps and they're going to be reflective of a loan environment that's commensurate with a 2% to 3% growth economy. given that we think we'll get our fair share, we'll put some very profitable relationships long-term high-quality relationships on the balance sheet, and at the e of the -- this
than we should have and it's the next election cycle or partisanship for the public interest has already taken and economic toll on what could have been because the bottom line is not only do we have to put these kind of savings policies in place, we have to be thoughtful about how we do them and when we are talking about spending, we have to think about how we not only bring spending down, but we readjust and prioritize and the budget completely emphasizes consumption instead of assumption. we need to turn that on its head and when we talk about revenue there is no question that was an aging population you have to bring in more revenue than you have in the past but if you do that in the same outdated anti-competitive tax system if you use this opportunity and you are bold about tax reform that we need on the individual and corporate side to open up our economic system you can do this in a way that is good for the economy so we have hard choices to make and we should give ourselves the time to put the policies in place that deal with the deficit and also have a vision and the sta
government to election toss try to get in there and help them with security, because it was clear that that was going to be one of their highest needs once they finally got stabilized. so there were a number of meetings. and i personally, i went to libya in october of 2011. i spoke with the then leadership, i met with them in international settings. we sent teams out, both civilian and military experts to try to help them. until recently, while they were going through their transitions it was a very difficult conversation because they didn't have, you know, the authority they thought. but now we're beginning and we have a long list of ways that we're trying to help improve security in libya. >> for example the october 2011 meeting at that meeting did this issue come up with regards to the inability of the libyan government to protect our institutions. did that come up at all in that conversation? >> we obviously talked a great deal about the deteriorating threat environment in libya. one of the reasons we had our own people on the ground, and why we were looking to try to figure o
re-elected because people would have seen it as statesmanship and leadership. now, we have had an unfortunate set of experiences here as recently as the end of last year, new year's eve, because we approached a manufactured crisis, a deadline known as the fiscal cliff, but i don't think anybody in america certainly anybody in this body really wants another 2:00 a.m. senate vote. not because it's inconvenient but because it's not a good thing in the people's house, the senate house of representatives to be voting in the dark of night when people aren't able to watch. nobody wants another cliffhanger that weakens public trust in our government or in our willingness to meet our responsibilities, and most of all no one wants another credit downgrade. now, this is important. the president talks about the importance of lifting the debt ceiling because he said we don't want to suffer another downgrade in our credit standing, but indeed one of the reasons why we have already suffered a negative response to our credit rating is because we haven't dealt with the real problems that confro
years ago they won the elections there. the military had to come in to take over the government to prevent them from assuming power. this phenomenon didn't happen overnight. it has been building in the arab world. rise of fundamentalist islam, the rise of radical politicized islam. we've seen its manifestation in a number of different ways including al qaeda. but it is broad and it's deep and the idea we can simply say as we've done the past four years the on terror is over, al qaeda is defeated, we don't have to worry about it, we can cut our defense budget without limit, we're seeing right now, right in front of us the danger of this kind of thinking. martha: what should we do? you know, if americans are still being held and this is a very fuzzy situation right now what should the reaction be? >> i think we need to get some clarity what's going on the ground but i think what it also shows you can't wait for this kind of event to happen before you plan in advance. i think we blindsided by the attack in benghazi, by the attacks on our other embassies. we should have plans in pla
now. this is the time to celebrate our democracy and celebrate the president's re-election. we'll be back at you some time soon but now is the time to take a little time off and be great that we're american. >> i know you will and i also know there are some issues in which we all ought to be able to work together. one of the things that i appreciate about you is that you've been able to do that, say that. it's important for the country. >> i think it's important for all of us to see this little goodwill, even if it's brief, especially around an historic moment like this right now. any final words you want to offer alex, governor, before you go? >> i had a huge mustache and didn't cut it until i was 26 because i wanted to look old and then i cut it off because i already was older looking and now alex will get a new lease on life. david, you look pretty good there, too. i think you're going to enjoy it. >> so that's the key to success, huh? >> you feel stronger, too, without that mustache? >> not just yet. i'm a little wobbly. it's cold up here now. >> governor, thanks very much
the right thing. thank you. [applause] >> now it gives me great pleasure to introduce a newly elected colleague from connecticut who will introduce our first witness and that is congresswoman elizabeth evidenty -- esty from connecticut and in whose district sandy hook elementary school resides. and what we will do is to have all of the various members introduced -- introduce our witnesses and then we will proceed with the testimony. congresswoman esty. >> thank you so much to my good friend rosa delauro. and thanks to all of you for being with us here today as witnesses to what happened in our community of newtown, connecticut, and as a call to action for what we must do as a country. i'm honored today to have the chance to interdues janet robinson who has become a good friend, who is a true american hero who responded in a time of unbelievable tragedy. for five years dr. janet robinson has served as the superintendent of schools in newtown, connecticut. throughout her career she has shown a constant and loving commitment to education and emproving the lives of children. in addition t
of the election polling survey research firms have proprietary algorithms and usually four, five, six questions that allow them to break out likely voters to read our goal and motivation for this research is something different. for this purpose we care about the views of all americans. and so, we wanted to report the rate of support among americans broadly speaking would. so we didn't ask that likely voter battery to be able to sense that data. there are other i think important ways once we have time to further analyze the data beyond what will appear in the chapter that may be of interest in terms of the region of the country. it's important also correlated with a gun ownership so that has to be done with care. parents versus non-parents. we talked about how age matters on this issue, and so just being here in the university context i think is important to understand how younger people versus older people think about issues related to gun violence to see whether there are generational effect and that gives insight into where we are going as a country as younger people become older and have mo
with aggravated assault. >>> a dramatic deadlock in israel where rival parties split parliamentary elections. prime minister benjamin netanyahu did win another term but is skrimabling to build another coalition among parties. the outcome could have a big outcome on the peace process. >>> one man in new zealand wants to ban cats. a prominent economist is calling for the erradication of domestic cats which he calls natural born killers. what? on a website to promote his cats to go campaign, he claims that cats in new zealand are wiping out wildlife. what about those mice? anyway, contributing to the extinction of nine bird species and endangering dozens of others. new zealand has the highest rate of cat opener ship in the world. and many cat lovers have launched their own websites to protest. i'm joining in on that protest. >> the anti-kitten campaign. >> a good percentage of the country is not going to like you. >> let's see a picture of grumpy cat today. >> thank you, natalie. al, how about a check of the weather? >> i'm concerned about my neighbor cat. anyway, let's show you as far as our w
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)